Scrip optimization to improve speed

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

Hi everybody. This question can probably only be answered by a true RT
guru. So, step up and prove yourself! I dare you!

We’ve got an RT 3.4.5 install (probably to move to 3.6 soon) that is
getting slower and slower for any transaction that involves lots of scrips.

Creating tickets, posting replies, and changing owners are the most
common things that cause a big slow down.

I did a late-night test and turned off all the scrips that go off on a
ticket create, and lo and behold, the time to create a ticket dropped by
about 30%. Not huge, but a noticeable improvement.

So, my question is this. Let’s say I have a lot of scrips that use the
same action (“Notify AdminCCs as Comment”, for example) and the same
Template, but different Conditions (“On Create”, “On Queue Change”, some
custom conditions, etc).

Would the speed improve if I consolidated all of the individual
conditions into a single custom super-condition? E.g., replace all the
scrips that use the same action and template into a since big scrip?

Rick R.

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: GnuPG v1.4.3 (MingW32)
Comment: Using GnuPG with Mozilla - http://enigmail.mozdev.org

iD8DBQFEtk/LXIxWysfLtmkRAkcnAJ0c9qtIPwo5G4reGZzDhl9sjtl/cgCeIf95
Vr0427UcNcP/6hZFUbqVZNg=
=1kpZ
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNED MESSAGE-----
Hash: SHA1

I think I know the answer to this, but I want to make sure.

I’m going to have to set up a new queue that will be restricted to a small
set of privileged users. But I currently have most rights assigned
globally, to a small set of groups, including ‘Everyone’ and 'Privileged.

Since there doesn’t appear to be a way to subtract global rights from
specific queues, does this mean I have no choice but to replicate all the
global rights that I don’t want to apply to the new restricted queue into
each of the other queues (and then delete the global rights)?

It would be nice not to have to do this, as we have several queues so it
can be a tedious process. I’m wondering if there is a technique I can use
to avoid this, though I suspect the answer is not what I want to hear.

Thanks.

Mike

Mike Friedman System and Network Security
mikef@ack.Berkeley.EDU 2484 Shattuck Avenue
1-510-642-1410 University of California at Berkeley
http://socrates.berkeley.edu/~mikef http://security.berkeley.edu

-----BEGIN PGP SIGNATURE-----
Version: PGP 6.5.8

iQA/AwUBRLfR8K0bf1iNr4mCEQLd1QCg6U+cTgyT3Zg6jR91smzQ3DTMg0UAmwbC
3VSTGwhxs2O6OWGncPAiGdyo
=qtKQ
-----END PGP SIGNATURE-----

Mike,

As far as i know, you hit it already. We have 50 Queues. Because we 

want so many of them to be run independently, we have very few Global
rights and grant most of the privileges at the Queue level. Initially,
we had a lot of overlap and redundancy so it took alot of work to do it
this way but now that it’s done, it was worth bitting the bullet.

Kenn
LBNL

Mike Friedman wrote: