RT for Project Management

All,

I was wondering if anyone is using RT for project management. It
seems like the devices of RT could serve that purpose very well.

The only reference I saw when searching the web was a message
from Tobias Brox in 1999:
http://lists.fsck.com/lists/rt-devel/9907/msg00065.html

I think that at my site we would want to write a new queue
display that was hierarchical (Parent->Child->Child, etc…).
Has anyone done that?

Thanks,
Matt Disney

It’s funny you should mention that. I’ve actually been working on
a Project Managment frontend for RT. At this point, it’s strictly a
hobby project, though if anyone’s interested in sponsoring the work,
I’d be happy to finish it up and clean it up for release.

It does the hierarchical view thing, it does rudimentary dependency-based
scheduling and I’ve even got a tool that draws gantt charts.

JesseOn Tue, Oct 02, 2001 at 12:33:55AM -0500, Matt Disney wrote:

All,

I was wondering if anyone is using RT for project management. It
seems like the devices of RT could serve that purpose very well.

The only reference I saw when searching the web was a message
from Tobias Brox in 1999:
http://lists.fsck.com/lists/rt-devel/9907/msg00065.html

I think that at my site we would want to write a new queue
display that was hierarchical (Parent->Child->Child, etc…).
Has anyone done that?

Thanks,
Matt Disney


rt-users mailing list
rt-users@lists.fsck.com
http://lists.fsck.com/mailman/listinfo/rt-users

http://www.bestpractical.com/products/rt – Trouble Ticketing. Free.

It’s funny you should mention that. I’ve actually been working on
a Project Managment frontend for RT. At this point, it’s strictly a
hobby project, though if anyone’s interested in sponsoring the work,
I’d be happy to finish it up and clean it up for release.

It does the hierarchical view thing, it does rudimentary dependency-based
scheduling and I’ve even got a tool that draws gantt charts.

projects and tickets are very often closely related in my experience,
and in fact i’ve been using a “projects” queue in rt for years. it
has been more of a todo queue than proper project management system,
but the ui is familiar to my team and that is 80% of the battle
towards people using it faithfully. i’d definately LOVE it if you’d
release a project frontend! it’d be great to be able to tie tickets
and projects together via rt2’s relationships mechanism.

i’ve changed jobs recently and am in the process of “selling” people
here on rt2 (they are adverse to ticket systems in general). we
really need both request tracking and project management. yes, please
do clean&release when ready. let me know if you’d like a beta tester
:wink:

| Jon Stearley (505) 845-7571 (FAX 844-2067) |
| Compaq Federal LLC High Performance Solutions |
| Sandia National Laboratories Scalable Systems Integration |

On Tue, 2 Oct 2001 09:10:10 -0600,
Jon Stearley jrstear@sandia.gov (js) writes:

js> towards people using it faithfully. i’d definately LOVE it if you’d
js> release a project frontend! it’d be great to be able to tie tickets
js> and projects together via rt2’s relationships mechanism.

I’ve been lurking on this list for a while. We’ve got a pretty
urgent need for something to track “issues”. Really, they’re
projects, but most of the project management tools I’ve come across
just don’t strike me as being quite what we want. The ability to
add messages to an issue in RT is really attractive. I’ve been on
this list because RT seemed closest to what I’d like to see. I
periodically dig through freshmeat.net and linas.org/linux/pm.html,
but still nothing else seems to grab my attention.

So, I too would be rather interested if these developments were
released in some form or another. It just might be enough to get me
off of my butt and install RT. :wink:

Amos

At 12:48 AM 10/2/01, Jesse Vincent wrote:

It’s funny you should mention that. I’ve actually been working on
a Project Managment frontend for RT. At this point, it’s strictly a
hobby project, though if anyone’s interested in sponsoring the work,
I’d be happy to finish it up and clean it up for release.

I’ll join the others and proclaim this to be a Good Thing. The main
disappointment that I have with other groupware/project packages is that
the ticketing is not tied closely enough with project activities. Since we
operate in both development and production modes on the same project this
would be a welcome addon to RT since everyone is already convinced that it
is the way to go for the helpdesk.

–chris

Sure, I think this would be a great thing as well. I’ll note, though,
that Jesse asked if anyone was interested in sponsoring the work, and no
one has (publicly) fessed up to that, yet. :wink:

Jesse, would you consider informal sponsorship from a group of interested
list members? I don’t have the ability to commit to full sponsorship
right now, but I could chip in $100 towards this project. If there are
others who feel the same, could we reach some target amount through
contributions?

Marc Hedlund
e: marc at precipice dot orgOn Tue, 9 Oct 2001, Christopher Kolar wrote:

At 12:48 AM 10/2/01, Jesse Vincent wrote:

It’s funny you should mention that. I’ve actually been working on
a Project Managment frontend for RT. At this point, it’s strictly a
hobby project, though if anyone’s interested in sponsoring the work,
I’d be happy to finish it up and clean it up for release.

I’ll join the others and proclaim this to be a Good Thing. The main
disappointment that I have with other groupware/project packages is that
the ticketing is not tied closely enough with project activities. Since we
operate in both development and production modes on the same project this
would be a welcome addon to RT since everyone is already convinced that it
is the way to go for the helpdesk.

–chris


rt-users mailing list
rt-users@lists.fsck.com
http://lists.fsck.com/mailman/listinfo/rt-users

Can anyone point me to a paper or FAQ with tips about setting up a project plan in RT?

Best way to use Depends on / Depended on vs. Parent / Child?

We do projects that gather a lot of information and are looking at RT for project management and Twiki for document output.

Thanks
Ed Matthews
g8orade@yahoo.com

Do you Yahoo!?
Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
http://new.mail.yahoo.com

Hi Ed,

have a look at the bps svn, there is a RT-Project Manager, its not done
completly but for the first step it is ok. For the things you describe i
think it could be useful if you use Dirk Pape’s Pre/Post Task Add On (wiki).

Torsten2007/1/26, Ed Matthews g8orade@yahoo.com:

Can anyone point me to a paper or FAQ with tips about setting up a project
plan in RT?

Best way to use Depends on / Depended on vs. Parent / Child?

We do projects that gather a lot of information and are looking at RT for
project management and Twiki for document output.

Thanks
Ed Matthews
g8orade@yahoo.com


Do you Yahoo!?
Everyone is raving about the all-new Yahoo! Mail beta.
http://new.mail.yahoo.com


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MFG

Torsten Brumm

http://www.torsten-brumm.de

All,

I would like to get started using RT for PM of a hardware, software integration project. There has been talk on this list about
using RT for project management. However, I have not read much about how others are doing it.
For instance, what is the most sensible way to set up queues? It seems like it might be good to give each group, e.g. SW
engineering, HW engineering, Applications Engineering etc., their own queue. But how would one determine which tickets belong to
which of many possible projects? Should each project have it’s own queue instead?
Anyone care to share how they apply RT to their general PM processes? It would be a big help to me.

Sincerely,
Bryan

Bryan D. Ellinger ellinger@adi.com
Applications Engineer
Applied Dynamics International
3800 Stone School Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
734.973.1300 ext. 289
734.668.0012 Fax
http://www.adi.com, mailto:support@adi.com

Bryan,

I’ve one acronym for you ITIL. It works for supporting huge dotcoms, all
the way to small projects. Typically you want queues that pertain to the
type of project that is being managed, you can spawn child tickets from
parent tickets for use if sending to different groups. etc… Google
ITIL… you may thank me for it.

Thanks,

Bill GraboyesOn Thu, Jul 23, 2009 at 12:00 PM, Bryan Ellinger ellinger@adi.com wrote:

All,

I would like to get started using RT for PM of a hardware, software
integration project. There has been talk on this list about
using RT for project management. However, I have not read much about how
others are doing it.
For instance, what is the most sensible way to set up queues? It seems like
it might be good to give each group, e.g. SW
engineering, HW engineering, Applications Engineering etc., their own
queue. But how would one determine which tickets belong to
which of many possible projects? Should each project have it’s own queue
instead?
Anyone care to share how they apply RT to their general PM processes? It
would be a big help to me.

Sincerely,
Bryan

Bryan D. Ellinger ellinger@adi.com
Applications Engineer
Applied Dynamics International
3800 Stone School Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
734.973.1300 ext. 289
734.668.0012 Fax
http://www.adi.com, mailto:support@adi.com


http://lists.bestpractical.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/rt-users

Community help: http://wiki.bestpractical.com
Commercial support: sales@bestpractical.com

Discover RT’s hidden secrets with RT Essentials from O’Reilly Media.
Buy a copy at http://rtbook.bestpractical.com

Bill Graboyes
On Assignment At:
Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc.
Consumer Portal Delivery
Office: (310) 468-6754
Cell: (714) 515-8312

-----Original Message-----
From: William Graboyes [mailto:william.graboyes@theportalgrp.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2009 4:36 PM
To: ellinger@adi.com
Cc: rt-users@lists.bestpractical.com
Subject: Re: [rt-users] RT for Project Management

Bryan,

I’ve one acronym for you ITIL. It works for supporting huge
dotcoms, all the way to small projects. Typically you want
queues that pertain to the type of project that is being
managed, you can spawn child tickets from parent tickets
for use if sending to different groups.

Bill,

Thanks for your comments. Let’s see if I get it.
You’re suggesting:
Set up queues for different types of projects, e.g. expansions, PCI systems, VME systems, Large-scale systems.
Set up groups for different business groups, e.g. Sales, Engineering, Field Service
The project manager create a top-level ticket, e.g. Build a PCI system for customer "X"
The project manager spawn children from that top-level ticket and assign owners, e.g. Specify IO – owner: engineering, Unit test –
owner: manufacturing etc.
Yes?

I checked out ITIL, and it looks like something worth investigating, and possibly integrating with our ISO 9000 program.

rt-users,

How does this compare to what you are doing?
What problems would crop up with this solution?

Bryan

Bryan,

RT (3.x ) is an issue tracking tool, not a Project Management tool.
There are no built-in charts and reports for such, as RT lets you devise
your own.
There are many Project Management (PM) and Portfolio Project Management
(PPM) tools out there, they cost a bit of money to either use their
system (SaaS/OnDemand) or to get their software installed “in house”. I
believe Project.Net is “open-source” so they would be a good pick for a
total PPM package. @Task is a good one (PPM), but it costs.
The PPM software available is also broken up by orientation (ie. IT PPM
or Business PPM, etc.).
I believe that RT 4.x is headed in that direction. Hopefully, it will
be a good competitive product with Project.net & @TASK. From what I’ve
seen of RT, I think it will.

However, using the RT version we have available, many things will need
to be added by you. First, you need to have an idea of what your
infrastructure will be. You need to have a WorkFlow process in place for
Reviewing & approving a ticket initially, the development done for a
ticket, and the QA aproval process.

This is important because all your work, new Queues, Groups, what work
will be in what Queues, what groups have rights to what work/Queues,
etc. will be based on that infrastructure/Workflow rules. The scrips you
write, both for notifications and for added functionality (like
pre-setting ticket owners based on a Custom Field value OR automatically
changing the status of a ticket because a ticket was “QA approvd”, like
resolving a ticket does) will all require consistency within that
agreed-upon infrastructure. Even the names you give Queues and groups
should have a consistency/convention that gives some structure to the
whole thing.

Once this is done, you will be able to decide what Queues to create,
groups of users, rights, what Custom Fields to create for which Queues
and how they will be used for ticket processing.

The Parent/Child/DependsOn Links that RT allows will easily fit into a
simple Query, but trying to get all the due dates of each
Parent/Child/DependsOn relationship will require a bit more complicated
SQL than you will get with RT Query.

So, until you have the infrastructure and workflow processes and naming
conventions worked out, it would be hard suggest what you asked for.

I hope I didn’t go too far in answering your question.;-).

Kenn
LBNLOn 7/23/2009 12:00 PM, Bryan Ellinger wrote:

All,

I would like to get started using RT for PM of a hardware, software integration project. There has been talk on this list about
using RT for project management. However, I have not read much about how others are doing it.
For instance, what is the most sensible way to set up queues? It seems like it might be good to give each group, e.g. SW
engineering, HW engineering, Applications Engineering etc., their own queue. But how would one determine which tickets belong to
which of many possible projects? Should each project have it’s own queue instead?
Anyone care to share how they apply RT to their general PM processes? It would be a big help to me.

Sincerely,
Bryan

Bryan D. Ellinger ellinger@adi.com
Applications Engineer
Applied Dynamics International
3800 Stone School Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
734.973.1300 ext. 289
734.668.0012 Fax
http://www.adi.com, mailto:support@adi.com


http://lists.bestpractical.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/rt-users

Community help: http://wiki.bestpractical.com
Commercial support: sales@bestpractical.com

Discover RT’s hidden secrets with RT Essentials from O’Reilly Media.
Buy a copy at http://rtbook.bestpractical.com

Just a word of warning - I have seen “ITIL Gone Wrong”, and I’m not sure
I’ve seen a bigger train wreck in my life than the implementation of ITIL at
my former employer. ITIL isn’t bad. Nor is it a silver bullet. It’s a
process model for running an IT organization within a business.

Regards.

-RobOn Thu, Jul 23, 2009 at 3:36 PM, William Graboyes < william.graboyes@theportalgrp.com> wrote:

Bryan,

I’ve one acronym for you ITIL. It works for supporting huge dotcoms, all
the way to small projects. Typically you want queues that pertain to the
type of project that is being managed, you can spawn child tickets from
parent tickets for use if sending to different groups. etc… Google
ITIL… you may thank me for it.

Thanks,

Bill Graboyes

On Thu, Jul 23, 2009 at 12:00 PM, Bryan Ellinger ellinger@adi.com wrote:

All,

I would like to get started using RT for PM of a hardware, software
integration project. There has been talk on this list about
using RT for project management. However, I have not read much about how
others are doing it.
For instance, what is the most sensible way to set up queues? It seems
like it might be good to give each group, e.g. SW
engineering, HW engineering, Applications Engineering etc., their own
queue. But how would one determine which tickets belong to
which of many possible projects? Should each project have it’s own queue
instead?
Anyone care to share how they apply RT to their general PM processes? It
would be a big help to me.

Sincerely,
Bryan

Bryan D. Ellinger ellinger@adi.com
Applications Engineer
Applied Dynamics International
3800 Stone School Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
734.973.1300 ext. 289
734.668.0012 Fax
http://www.adi.com, mailto:support@adi.com


http://lists.bestpractical.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/rt-users

Community help: http://wiki.bestpractical.com
Commercial support: sales@bestpractical.com

Discover RT’s hidden secrets with RT Essentials from O’Reilly Media.
Buy a copy at http://rtbook.bestpractical.com


Bill Graboyes
On Assignment At:
Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc.
Consumer Portal Delivery
Office: (310) 468-6754
Cell: (714) 515-8312


http://lists.bestpractical.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/rt-users

Community help: http://wiki.bestpractical.com
Commercial support: sales@bestpractical.com

Discover RT’s hidden secrets with RT Essentials from O’Reilly Media.
Buy a copy at http://rtbook.bestpractical.com

Kenn,

Thank you for sharing your work. I will check it out.

Bryan

Bryan,

Another suggestion. WE use AdminCc as the Queue/Project managers. that
way, we can assign rights to them that allow them to change ACL for
groups using the Queue, re-assigning (steal) tickets, etc. I have a
suggested rights list that works for us in giving a basic hierarchy of
rights (reduces redundancy, etc.) and explains how some of the rights
work together (like “CreateTicket”, “SeeQueue” for creating tickets via
web). It is attached.
We also developed a RT USER Guide for regular users/developers which
explains how to use the Query, using Custom Fields, etc. with screen
shots. This is all on 3.6.x (Sorry. We’re in the midst of testing 3.8.4
on our dev machine).
Lots of luck.

Kenn
LBNLOn 7/23/2009 2:36 PM, Bryan Ellinger wrote:

-----Original Message-----
From: William Graboyes [mailto:william.graboyes@theportalgrp.com]
Sent: Thursday, July 23, 2009 4:36 PM
To: ellinger@adi.com
Cc: rt-users@lists.bestpractical.com
Subject: Re: [rt-users] RT for Project Management

Bryan,

I’ve one acronym for you ITIL. It works for supporting huge
dotcoms, all the way to small projects. Typically you want
queues that pertain to the type of project that is being
managed, you can spawn child tickets from parent tickets
for use if sending to different groups.

Bill,

Thanks for your comments. Let’s see if I get it.
You’re suggesting:
Set up queues for different types of projects, e.g. expansions, PCI systems, VME systems, Large-scale systems.
Set up groups for different business groups, e.g. Sales, Engineering, Field Service
The project manager create a top-level ticket, e.g. Build a PCI system for customer "X"
The project manager spawn children from that top-level ticket and assign owners, e.g. Specify IO – owner: engineering, Unit test –
owner: manufacturing etc.
Yes?

I checked out ITIL, and it looks like something worth investigating, and possibly integrating with our ISO 9000 program.

rt-users,

How does this compare to what you are doing?
What problems would crop up with this solution?

Bryan

etc… Google ITIL…
you may thank me for it.for >
Thanks,

Bill Graboyes

On Thu, Jul 23, 2009 at 12:00 PM, Bryan Ellinger ellinger@adi.com wrote:

All,

I would like to get started using RT for PM of a
hardware, software integration project. There has been talk
on this list about
using RT for project management. However, I have not
read much about how others are doing it.
For instance, what is the most sensible way to set up
queues? It seems like it might be good to give each group, e.g. SW
engineering, HW engineering, Applications Engineering
etc., their own queue. But how would one determine which
tickets belong to
which of many possible projects? Should each project
have it’s own queue instead?
Anyone care to share how they apply RT to their general
PM processes? It would be a big help to me.

Sincerely,
Bryan

Bryan D. Ellinger ellinger@adi.com
Applications Engineer
Applied Dynamics International
3800 Stone School Road
Ann Arbor, MI 48108
734.973.1300 ext. 289
734.668.0012 Fax
http://www.adi.com, mailto:support@adi.com


http://lists.bestpractical.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/rt-users

Community help: http://wiki.bestpractical.com
Commercial support: sales@bestpractical.com

Discover RT’s hidden secrets with RT Essentials from
O’Reilly Media.
Buy a copy at http://rtbook.bestpractical.com


Bill Graboyes
On Assignment At:
Toyota Motor Sales, USA, Inc.
Consumer Portal Delivery
Office: (310) 468-6754
Cell: (714) 515-8312


http://lists.bestpractical.com/cgi-bin/mailman/listinfo/rt-users

Community help: http://wiki.bestpractical.com
Commercial support: sales@bestpractical.com

Discover RT’s hidden secrets with RT Essentials from O’Reilly Media.
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RT Rights.doc (59.5 KB)

Global Defaultl Priv.doc (45 KB)

RT Queue Default Priv.doc (47 KB)