RT Essentials review?

I am considering purchasing the RT Essentials book. Since there’s no
table of contents on-line, and the example chapter is on installing RT,
it’s tough to get a feel for how in-depth the book is.

Can anyone share any insights?

-matt

Matthew Hanley
mhanley@cxtec.com

I am considering purchasing the RT Essentials book. Since there’s no
table of contents on-line, and the example chapter is on installing RT,
it’s tough to get a feel for how in-depth the book is.

Can anyone share any insights?

Buy it.

I’ve been using RT since 1.0 and each time we moved forward to new versions,
I had to wrap my mind around how something worked.

Right now, we’re moving from 2.X to 3.4 and the book has saved me quite a bit
of time with the learning curve. The visual representations of the object
model have helped me understand which direction to go when doing stuff
within templates (for example). This and the section on Hook::LexWrap have
paid for the book several times over in the amount of time I’ve saved NOT
having to troll code and poke through the mailing lists (or wiki).

Really, it’s not an expensive book, it’s worth having it around, even if you
buy it just to support Jesse, Robert, Dave, Darren, and Richard in future
revisions of the code and documentation.

Heck, buy two. Give one to a friend in another company. Help spread the
use of RT. :slight_smile:

Travis
Travis Campbell - Unix Systems Administrator = travis@mpdtxmail.amd.com
5900 E. Ben White Blvd, Austin, TX 78741 = travis.campbell@amd.com
TEL: (512) 602-1888 PAG: (512) 604-0341 = webmaster@mpdtxmail.amd.com
"Does anything work as expected?" Yes. An axe through the CPU.

> On Thu, Sep 08, 2005 at 02:42:56PM -0400, Matt Hanley wrote:

I am considering purchasing the RT Essentials book. Since there’s no
table of contents on-line, and the example chapter is on installing RT,
it’s tough to get a feel for how in-depth the book is.

Can anyone share any insights?

Buy it.

I’ve been using RT since 1.0 and each time we moved forward to new
versions,
I had to wrap my mind around how something worked.

Right now, we’re moving from 2.X to 3.4 and the book has saved me quite a
bit
of time with the learning curve. The visual representations of the object
model have helped me understand which direction to go when doing stuff
within templates (for example). This and the section on Hook::LexWrap
have
paid for the book several times over in the amount of time I’ve saved NOT
having to troll code and poke through the mailing lists (or wiki).

Really, it’s not an expensive book, it’s worth having it around, even if
you
buy it just to support Jesse, Robert, Dave, Darren, and Richard in future
revisions of the code and documentation.

Heck, buy two. Give one to a friend in another company. Help spread the
use of RT. :slight_smile:

I agree. Great book and help spread the word.

Kind Regards,

Gavin Henry.
Managing Director.

T +44 (0) 1224 279484
M +44 (0) 7930 323266
F +44 (0) 1224 742001
E ghenry@suretecsystems.com

Open Source. Open Solutions™.

http://www.suretecsystems.com/

“Matt Hanley” MHANLEY@cxtec.com writes:

I am considering purchasing the RT Essentials book. Since there’s no
table of contents on-line, and the example chapter is on installing RT,
it’s tough to get a feel for how in-depth the book is.

Can anyone share any insights?

I got my copy this morning and I’m currently browsing through it.

It seems very promising, with thorough chapters on writing scrips and
the architecture of RT.

On the downside, the book could use some proofreading and editing.
There are quite a few cut’n’paste errors, and the writing is not
always crystal clear. For example, the second and third paragraphs of
the section “Associating Related Tickets” on page 42 are rather
confusing:

[About Depends On/Depended On By] You can create this relationship
from the other direction as well: on the Links form for the original
ticket you can enter the new ticket’s number in the Depends On
field. Once this relationship is established, the parent ticket
cannot be resolved until the child ticket is resolved. A ticket can
have multiple parents and multiple children, which can be used to
create arbitrarily complex and interdependent workflows.

The Depends On/Depended On By relationships are similar to the
parent and child relationships. The practical difference is that RT
doesn’t enforce the relationships. With parent/child relationships,
the parent ticket cannot be resolved until all the child tickets are
resolved, but with Depends On/Depended On By relationships, either
ticket can be resolved without the other.

OK, I’m rather sleepy today, but I’m having trouble following this…

Leif Nixon - Systems expert
National Supercomputer Centre - Linkoping University

“Matt Hanley” MHANLEY@cxtec.com writes:

I am considering purchasing the RT Essentials book. Since there’s no
table of contents on-line, and the example chapter is on installing RT,
it’s tough to get a feel for how in-depth the book is.

Can anyone share any insights?

I got my copy this morning and I’m currently browsing through it.

It seems very promising, with thorough chapters on writing scrips and
the architecture of RT.

On the downside, the book could use some proofreading and editing.
There are quite a few cut’n’paste errors, and the writing is not
always crystal clear. For example, the second and third paragraphs of
the section “Associating Related Tickets” on page 42 are rather
confusing:

[About Depends On/Depended On By] You can create this relationship
from the other direction as well: on the Links form for the original
ticket you can enter the new ticket’s number in the Depends On
field. Once this relationship is established, the parent ticket
cannot be resolved until the child ticket is resolved. A ticket can
have multiple parents and multiple children, which can be used to
create arbitrarily complex and interdependent workflows.

The Depends On/Depended On By relationships are similar to the
parent and child relationships. The practical difference is that RT
doesn’t enforce the relationships. With parent/child relationships,
the parent ticket cannot be resolved until all the child tickets are
resolved, but with Depends On/Depended On By relationships, either
ticket can be resolved without the other.

Actually, it sounds like the logic is backwards in that last
paragraph. I am pretty sure it is the Depends On/Depended On By relationships
that RT enforces resolution on.

-Todd

We’re glad that everyone likes the book! On behalf of all the
authors, I know we all had a great time writing it, and are quite
proud of it.

Please report any and all errata to
http://www.oreilly.com/cgi-bin/errata.form/rtessentials
so we can make sure to get things fixed in future editions/printings.