Filter incoming mail prior to RT?


#1

hello –

question: is there a way to filter incoming messages and act on them
(delete, print a copy, etc) prior to them being put into the rt queue?

example: "support@somehost.com" has an entry in /etc/aliases that puts all
incoming mail for ‘support’ into a queue. you want to be able to dispose of
certain pieces of mail without it ever reaching the RT queue, or print a
copy of selected things and move them along into the queue.

using mandrake 7 with sendmail, procmail as the local delivery agent.
quickly skimmed over a few man pages and came to the conclusion that entries
in /etc/aliases would get acted on before procmail got a chance to filter –
is this correct?

any help appreciated, i don’t want to dig into the bowels of sendmail if i
don’t have to. :slight_smile:


#2

Instead, invoke RT from procmail.

jesseOn Fri, Jun 23, 2000 at 11:43:53PM +0000, hohokus wombat wrote:

hello –

question: is there a way to filter incoming messages and act on them
(delete, print a copy, etc) prior to them being put into the rt queue?

example: "support@somehost.com" has an entry in /etc/aliases that puts all
incoming mail for ‘support’ into a queue. you want to be able to dispose of
certain pieces of mail without it ever reaching the RT queue, or print a
copy of selected things and move them along into the queue.

using mandrake 7 with sendmail, procmail as the local delivery agent.
quickly skimmed over a few man pages and came to the conclusion that entries
in /etc/aliases would get acted on before procmail got a chance to filter –
is this correct?

any help appreciated, i don’t want to dig into the bowels of sendmail if i
don’t have to. :slight_smile:


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