User Database empty?

Hello again, I think I found the problem with logging in to the web portal, but
I do not know how to fix it. We tried the default root/password credentials and
every other permutation with the database user/password created in
RT_SiteConfig.pm, but we still couldn’t log in. After checking the MySQL
databases, we discovered the the user database was empty, no superuser, no
nothing. How can we manually add the root/password superuser to the MySQL table
so that we can log into the system?

Thanks,

Max Bern

After checking the MySQL databases, we discovered the the user database
was empty, no superuser, no nothing. How can we manually add the
root/password superuser to the MySQL table so that we can log into the
system?

It sounds like the “make initdb” step didn’t finish successfully. If
there’s no data you care about, you should drop the database and try
running make initdb again.

Thomas

Please make sure to keep replies on the list. Thanks.On 07/22/2010 04:44 PM, Max Bern wrote:

$ /usr/sbin/rt-setup-database --action init

is this the step you were talking about? we just tried it and it failed because root@localhost is denied entry.

No. The step I’m talking about is running “make initdb” (or “make
initialize-database”) from the source directory. Please read the README
that comes with RT’s source and follow the installation instructions.

If root@localhost is denied, then you either need to specify the correct
DBA user and password when you run ./configure or fix your MySQL
permissions configuration.

Thomas

I wiped the database as per Thomas Sibley’s advice, but now I can’t figure out
how to make it again, we have gone through the entire installation process and
the part:

rt-setup-database --action init

returns an error saying that we are denied. I have full root priviledges. Do I
have to do some sort of -p or -u to use that command? and will that make the
database with the root/password superuser default available?

CentOS5 with RT, if it matters.

Thanks,

Max Bern

How do I keep replies on the list? and the 'make initialize-database’
command doesn’t work with CentOS, which is what our instance of RT is
installed upon, I thought I had said that in the original post but
apparently not. We followed the CentOS install instructions from the RT
Wiki to the tee, but it still doesn’t recognize the default user on the
web portal.

Reply to All, and then edit my address off leaving only the list.

If you’re installing from the RPMs at http://www.tlviewer.org/rt3/ as
the wiki suggests, then please stop now. The version available there,
3.8.2, is out of date and has known security vulnerabilities that have
been fixed in subsequent 3.8 releases.

Please download and install the latest RT 3.8.8 from source from our
website. It contains a README with instructions. Follow them and make
sure all the steps finish successfully, and you should have a working RT.

Thomas

Just to give you a help with the permissions - using that tool, as far as I’m aware, uses the user/password and database details as per the /opt/rt3/etc/RT_SiteConfig.pm file (though I’m writing this from memory from when I last installed), you might wish to double check the information in that is what you’re expecting it to be in order to initialise the database.

PeterOn 22 Jul 2010, at 22:46, Max Bern wrote:

I wiped the database as per Thomas Sibley’s advice, but now I can’t figure out how to make it again, we have gone through the entire installation process and the part:

rt-setup-database --action init

returns an error saying that we are denied. I have full root priviledges. Do I have to do some sort of -p or -u to use that command? and will that make the database with the root/password superuser default available?

CentOS5 with RT, if it matters.

Thanks,

Max Bern

Discover RT’s hidden secrets with RT Essentials from O’Reilly Media.
Buy a copy at http://rtbook.bestpractical.com

I think the reason why the ‘make’ commands do not work to install 3.8.8 is that
CentOS doesn’t use that command. The big problem here is that we are trying to
install RT on a remote CentOS box with only the terminal to work with. We have
been trying to install RT on this box for the entire week, have gotten nothing
but problems, and now we are hopelessly confused. If someone could point me to
an install tutorial for CentOS5 and RT 3.8.8 it would make my week.

Thanks everyone, so much.

Max BernFrom: Peter Murfitt peter@petermurfitt.com
To: rt-users@lists.bestpractical.com
Sent: Thu, July 22, 2010 2:51:32 PM
Subject: Re: [rt-users] User Database empty?

Just to give you a help with the permissions - using that tool, as far as I’m
aware, uses the user/password and database details as per the
/opt/rt3/etc/RT_SiteConfig.pm file (though I’m writing this from memory from
when I last installed), you might wish to double check the information in that
is what you’re expecting it to be in order to initialise the database.

Peter

I wiped the database as per Thomas Sibley’s advice, but now I can’t figure out
how to make it again, we have gone through the entire installation process and
the part:

rt-setup-database --action init

returns an error saying that we are denied. I have full root priviledges. Do I
have to do some sort of -p or -u to use that command? and will that make the
database with the root/password superuser default available?

CentOS5 with RT, if it matters.

Thanks,

Max Bern

Discover RT’s hidden secrets with RT Essentials from O’Reilly Media.
Buy a copy at http://rtbook.bestpractical.com

Max Bern wrote:

I think the reason why the ‘make’ commands do not work to install
3.8.8 is that CentOS doesn’t use that command. The big problem here is
that we are trying to install RT on a remote CentOS box with only the
terminal to work with. We have been trying to install RT on this box
for the entire week, have gotten nothing but problems, and now we are
hopelessly confused. If someone could point me to an install tutorial
for CentOS5 and RT 3.8.8 it would make my week.
As Thomas already told you need to get started by downloading the source
tar.gz from bestpractical.com
Then you’ll need to make sure that you have a working compiler (gcc) +
assorted utilities to compile all needed modules (make and friends). A
normal Centos install should these have installed but you can check
with: yum info gcc make binutils
The output is info per package and the line with Repo in it should read
’Installed’ and maybe there is also a Repo: base then that means there
is a update available in the repository ‘base’.

Then read the README again and start.
cd into the unpacked source directory
Make sure you add the correct parameters to you’re configure command,
do: ./configure --help to see all possibilities
fix any problems spotted by configure if needed.
make testdeps
( this will spit out a whole set of missing perl modules)
fix this with: make fixdeps
This will pull in all needed CPAN modules BUT beware that for some perl
modules you’ll need to have the underlying developer headers and
libraries so install those with yum install abc-devel if needed. One
example is GD.
If all goes well you’ll end up with all modules installed.
Edit /opt/rt3/etc/RT_SiteConfig.pm to your needs
Edit httpd.conf to your needs
start httpd, login to RT

Thats about how I do it myself (using Centos5 and RT and Oracle)

Regards,

Joop

Max,

I just followed these instructions(but instead of doing the packaged 3.6, I
did the manual 3.8.8 install), and they worked fine, with some minor
troubleshooting throughout…

http://wiki.bestpractical.com/view/CentOS5InstallGuide

Some things that I had to do that weren’t in the manual, was a few perl-XXX
installs using yum(I don’t recall exactly what).

If you do the 3.8.8 install with mysql, when you are doing the CPAN stuff
referenced in

http://www.ptitov.net/2008/07/request-tracker-installation-o.html

you have to look at the dependencies that CPAN says is missing, then I just
yum installed those(that’s the perl-XXX where XXX was the rest of the name).

Also at the bottom of the page, I had to tinker with the way I set my apache
config to load RT… other than those few steps that aren’t mentioned, the
guide is pretty damn good.

Good luck!
Mike.On Fri, Jul 23, 2010 at 2:52 AM, Joop JoopvandeWege@mococo.nl wrote:

Max Bern wrote:

I think the reason why the ‘make’ commands do not work to install 3.8.8
is that CentOS doesn’t use that command. The big problem here is that we are
trying to install RT on a remote CentOS box with only the terminal to work
with. We have been trying to install RT on this box for the entire week,
have gotten nothing but problems, and now we are hopelessly confused. If
someone could point me to an install tutorial for CentOS5 and RT 3.8.8 it
would make my week.

As Thomas already told you need to get started by downloading the source
tar.gz from bestpractical.com
Then you’ll need to make sure that you have a working compiler (gcc) +
assorted utilities to compile all needed modules (make and friends). A
normal Centos install should these have installed but you can check with:
yum info gcc make binutils
The output is info per package and the line with Repo in it should read
’Installed’ and maybe there is also a Repo: base then that means there is a
update available in the repository ‘base’.

Then read the README again and start.
cd into the unpacked source directory
Make sure you add the correct parameters to you’re configure command, do:
./configure --help to see all possibilities
fix any problems spotted by configure if needed.
make testdeps
( this will spit out a whole set of missing perl modules)
fix this with: make fixdeps
This will pull in all needed CPAN modules BUT beware that for some perl
modules you’ll need to have the underlying developer headers and libraries
so install those with yum install abc-devel if needed. One example is GD.
If all goes well you’ll end up with all modules installed.
Edit /opt/rt3/etc/RT_SiteConfig.pm to your needs
Edit httpd.conf to your needs
start httpd, login to RT

Thats about how I do it myself (using Centos5 and RT and Oracle)

Regards,

Joop

Discover RT’s hidden secrets with RT Essentials from O’Reilly Media.
Buy a copy at http://rtbook.bestpractical.com

Mike Johnson
Datatel Programmer/Analyst
Northern Ontario School of Medicine
955 Oliver Road
Thunder Bay, ON P7B 5E1
Phone: (807) 766-7331
Email: mike.johnson@nosm.ca