Filtering troublesome tickets with procmail

Hey everyone,

I got burned a few weeks ago when someone in my organization sent a meeting request to RT. That produced a bit of a mail storm as the requests started flying around. We got it under control, and I’ve now added a procmail rule to intercept meeting request emails and send them right to /dev/null. I also thought it would be good to insert a rule that could be engaged in case of “emergency” to filter communication for any particular ticket.

For example, I tried the following:

Filter out troublesome ticket emails

:0

  • ^Subject: .*[BHM #448]
    /dev/null

The problem is that this rule is catching everything, whether it’s ticket #448 or not. I’m not exactly a procmail wizard, but I don’t see the problem here. Any ideas?

-Tim

Tim Wilson, Director of Technology
Buffalo-Hanover-Montrose Schools
214 1st Ave NE Buffalo, MN 55313
ph: 763.682.8740 fax: 763.682.8743 http://www.buffalo.k12.mn.us

Hey everyone,

I got burned a few weeks ago when someone in my organization sent a meeting re
quest to RT. That produced a bit of a mail storm as the requests started flyin
g around. We got it under control, and I’ve now added a procmail rule to inter
cept meeting request emails and send them right to /dev/null. I also thought i
t would be good to insert a rule that could be engaged in case of "emergency"
to filter communication for any particular ticket.

For example, I tried the following:

Filter out troublesome ticket emails

:0

  • ^Subject: .*[BHM #448]
    /dev/null

The problem is that this rule is catching everything, whether it’s ticket #448
or not. I’m not exactly a procmail wizard, but I don’t see the problem here.
Any ideas?

Just a guess, but maybe the brackets are interpreted as
part of the regexp, not literally? Try:

* ^Subject: .*\[BHM \#448\]

bobg